NO MORE SHUSHING... WE NEED TO SPEAK UP TO KILL THE STIGMA. Hello my lovely ladies. We need to talk. We need to talk about the one thing we are constantly asked to not talk about. We need to talk about that time of the month. That time of the month we sneak off to the bathroom with out pads and tampons hidden deep in our bags…cause god if forbid anyone sees them and figures us out.. Yup that’s right, PERIODS…
NO MORE SHUSHING… WE NEED TO SPEAK UP TO KILL THE STIGMA.
Hello my lovely ladies. We need to talk. We need to talk about the one thing we are constantly asked to not talk about. We need to talk about that time of the month. That time of the month we sneak off to the bathroom with out pads and tampons hidden deep in our bags…cause god if forbid anyone sees them and figures us out.. Yup that’s right, PERIODS…

Period, auntie flow, the visitor, it’s shark week, on the rag, my mensies… so many words and terms to describe a natural cycle that occurs throughout much of our lives, and yet so many of us (understandably due to our cultures sshushing us) find ourselves still talking in code when ever the topic comes up. Staying quiet about this particular topic, under the understanding that it’s the polite thing to do helps keep this topic in the margins and treats it as a taboo subject in society. And topics that are taboo often come attached with stigma and shame, as well as a ton of misinformation and myths – an unfortunate state seeing as how about half of the world’s population has a bloody shark week once a month when auntie flow comes to town with the her rag. But why is this so, why does our society praise one gender’s step into adulthood and shame the other?... Why is a boy’s right of passage into manhood celebrated but a girl’s kept quiet from the world. We slaughter goats and party when the boy circumcised but the day a girl releases one drop of menstrual blood the world shuns her. It’s disgusting, you’re dirty… “you can’t participate in this cause of your p…pe….it’s your time of the month”. Why is this so? To me the craziest part about this is that fact that the world wasn’t always like this; in fact, centuries ago, there were countless different cultural practices surrounding menstruation that were positive and dare I say it, even empowering. For example, in Hinduism, the great mothers created the universe from “clotted substances” and in Mesopotamia, the goddess Ninhursag used a mixture of clay and menstrual blood to make humans. In Egyptian and Celtic cultures, menstrual blood was thought to turn mortals into gods and goddesses…… in other words, in those days, women were f$%king bad a$$, goddesses, creators of man. But as history progressed, a more patriarchal view of menstruation began to take over, nen such as Aristotle and Hippocrates thought that menstruation was something toxic that must be avoided. Other cultures believed that menstrual blood would turn wine sour, wither crops, and even dull steel. And as years turned into decades and decades to centuries menstruation got an even worse rep. But thankfully things are slowly starting to change! Women from all walks of life are coming together to remove the stigma around menstruation in society. Women such as Adelle, Anita Nderu, Kambua and myself, with full support from P&G and Always, have spoken out in many different ways about menstruation. All we want is to kill the shame and stigma around periods by having an open conversation. Talking about our experiences with auntie flow aka our periods in hopes that we are making a small difference. All we want is a world where we are not looked down upon all because of a few drops of blood. Because let’s face it. With out those few drops of blood every month the world wouldn’t have a population…. Hell, maybe the anceint Egyptians, Hindus and Celtics were right… we are BAD A$$ES.

  • Period, auntie flow, the visitor, it’s shark week, on the rag, my mensies… so many words and terms to describe a natural cycle that occurs throughout much of our lives, and yet so many of us (understandably due to our cultures sshushing us) find ourselves still talking in code when ever the topic comes up. Staying quiet about this particular topic, under the understanding that it’s the polite thing to do helps keep this topic in the margins and treats it as a taboo subject in society. And topics that are taboo often come attached with stigma and shame, as well as a ton of misinformation and myths – an unfortunate state seeing as how about half of the world’s population has a bloody shark week once a month when auntie flow comes to town with her rag.
  • But why is this OKAY, why does our society praise one gender’s step into adulthood and shame the other?… Why is a boy’s rite of passage into manhood celebrated but a girl’s kept quiet from the world. We slaughter goats and party when the boy gets circumcised but the day a girl releases one drop of menstrual blood the world shuns her. It’s disgusting, you’re dirty… “you can’t participate in this cause of your p…pe….it’s your time of the month”. Why is this so?
  • To me the craziest part about this is that fact that the world wasn’t always like this; in fact, centuries ago, there were countless different cultural practices surrounding menstruation that were positive and dare I say it, even empowering. For example, in Hinduism, the great mothers created the universe from “clotted substances” and in Mesopotamia, the goddess Ninhursag used a mixture of clay and menstrual blood to make humans. In Egyptian and Celtic cultures, menstrual blood was thought to turn mortals into gods and goddesses…… in other words, in those days, women were f$%king bad a$$, goddesses, creators of man. But as history progressed, a more patriarchal view of menstruation began to take over, nen such as Aristotle and Hippocrates thought that menstruation was something toxic that must be avoided. Other cultures believed that menstrual blood would turn wine sour, wither crops, and even dull steel. And as years turned into decades and decades to centuries menstruation got an even worse rep.
    But thankfully things are slowly starting to change! Women from all walks of life are coming together to remove the stigma around menstruation in society. Women such as Adelle, Anita Nderu, Kambua and myself, with full support from P&G and Always, have spoken out in many different ways about menstruation. All we want is to kill the shame and stigma around periods by having an open conversation. Talking about our experiences with auntie flow aka our periods in hopes that we are making a small difference. All we want is a world where we are not looked down upon all because of a few drops of blood. Because let’s face it. With out those few drops of blood every month the world wouldn’t have a population…. Hell, maybe the anceint Egyptians, Hindus and Celtics were right… we are BAD A$$ES.

 

19 COMMENTS

  1. Women are told to hush up about a lot of things, its so annoying! But such posts brighten me up! We are as bad a$$… Laura Croft typa way!

    • awww thank you so much. and we need to stop hushing up. lets stop being “polite”. talking about it… having an open conversation about such subjects will be the only way to start killing the stigma around it.

  2. I learnt something today about periods from Jambi Koikai… It’s not normal to have painful periods. I always thought that it’s normal and always dreads that time of the month

      • It’s not normal when it’s unbelievable pain. There’s muscular cramps yes, but more often than not, really painful periods could be anything from a thorough hormonal imbalance to endometriosis (inflammation of the endometrial wall-which doesn’t get enough attention).

        Essentially, according to my gynaecologist, periods should be painless. Just a smidget of discomfort due to muscular contractions but it shouldn’t amount to pain. I had to check my diet, cut down on dairy, loose tonnes of weight and exercise but what really did amaze me is the moment I’d lost just 10kg and I was exercising on the regular, zero pain. This was coming from a person who’d once had a 3week period episode back in Nov 2015.

        I take my period as a reminder from mother nature that I can bring forth life. That in itself is endearing.

        We need to keep this conversation going.

        • Ohh yes I remember that diet is super important. I know that when you are cramping, you should avoid eating and drinking overly sweet things. Like sodas will be the death of you and your poor uterus. And thank you so much for sharing. I’m sure it will help someone.

        • I went vegan cold turkey and when my period came, I was shocked!! I had zero pain, something I believed to be a myth. (This coming from someone who’s been in an ambulance a few times due to excruciating period pain.) I’m vegetarian now and although I get a bit of pain, it’s nothing paracetamols can’t handle. I’m once again going on a dairy-free diet bcoz I think milk is the worst enemy to menses. It’s a struggle having to watch what you eat just to avoid a day of wailing in bed but it’s totally worth it. A million times better than contraceptives.

      • It’s most affected by our diet. Painful cramps are an anomaly. We have been taught it’s normal since we were young but it’s not. Look up everything Dr Mcdougall talks about on health. My sis and I love your blog btw

  3. I really love the post on saying no to stigma..?? I think you should address more social issues on your blog as you have done..thank you so much you are an inspiration Joy Kendi

  4. The way you do your things is just out of this world you are my all time favourite. The time I saw that picture on this LET’S KILL THE STIGMA blog i knew something great was cooking. Thankyou for always putting things the way they are. You are simply amazing.

  5. Just when I thought I couldn’t like you any more. Your feminism and the way you unashamedly speak about this topic warms my heart. I am opposed to patriarchy and I hope we all start a small gang and kick its ass. To badass women, through and through

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